Published on September 27, 2017

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Photography by andy stagg via designboom
Maximalism is undeniably the It trend of the year. As many strive to break away from the streamlined aesthetic so deeply rooted in minimalism, there is an ever-growing appreciation for schemes in which abundance is key. With maximalism comes the opportunity to layer eclectic arrays of colors with vibrant patterns and unexpected prints. Following the recent conclusion of the 2017 London Design Festival, one thing was clear: maximalism is here to stay. 
 
At the apex of the maximalist design movement, the resurgence of Memphis design has done much to promote the reprisal of the trend. Textile designer Camille Walala is the latest to do so via Villa Walala. The outdoor installation, in London’s Broadgate neighborhood, emulated Ettore Sottsass’ classic Memphis design movement through a series of inflatable pieces, which even included a bouncy house. Our biggest takeaway? When it comes to our interiors, it’s time to embrace the mix of primary shades and bold stripes.

Photo by Andy Stagg via Designboom

Fashion designer Peter Pilotto took to a London townhouse with an aesthetic he would describe as “tropical-baroque.” It’s safe to say that there were no shortage of colors and patterns, especially those that skewed towards the warmer tones. The colorful interior incorporates the season’s trending shades, mashing together the most unexpected of pairings. Inside, warm textures of saturated velvets came coupled with minty greens and an overpowering lilac that stole the show. Here, a deep, worn orange has us seriously reconsidering the hue in the form of wall paint. 

In King’s Cross’ Granary Square, London-based designer Adam Nathaniel Furman joined forces with Turkish Ceramics to create the Gateways—a set of 4×4 meter ceramic gateways, each boasting an intricately vibrant design comprised of colorful tiles. Following in suit of the overarching theme of the festival, primary hues and exaggerated patterns were among the more defiant of the trends. If this isn’t a prime example of mixing and matching tiles, we don’t know what is. 

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