Our days are punctuated by scouting new talent, attending market appointments, and scrolling Instagram in an effort to unearth the products, people, and news you actually need to know. Here’s what we Slacked one another about this week.

New Shop on the Block: Desert Vintage New York 

Wavy Candles to Help Ukraine, Squeeze-Bottle Olive Oil, and the Vintage Shop New Yorkers Need

Ever since I first followed Desert Vintage on Instagram—Tucson’s expertly curated vintage clothing store —I’ve dreamed of what it would be like to shop there IRL. And as of this month, that dream has become a reality. The power couple behind the outlet opened the doors to their second location, on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, and worked with Green River Project to design the space. Inspired by Louise Bourgeois’s studio, mahogany furniture, painted wood floors, and even an old claw-foot tub make it truly original. —Julia Stevens, style editor

Main Squeeze: Graza Olive Oil 

Wavy Candles to Help Ukraine, Squeeze-Bottle Olive Oil, and the Vintage Shop New Yorkers Need

As someone who has spent way too much on olive oil in the past (leading to extreme rationing while cooking), I’m ecstatic to report that ever since Graza’s countertop combo arrived, I’ve been frying, drizzling, dipping, and squeezing—yes, you read that right—to my heart’s content. The plastic bottle gives retro, restaurant condiment vibes, so that both my hands and kitchen counters are less sticky by the end of preparing a meal. Needless to say, I’ll be the first on the brand’s wait list when the next launch is announced. —Morgan Bulman, associate commerce editor


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Everything’s Bigger in Texas: Supply Showroom’s First Wallpaper Line

Wavy Candles to Help Ukraine, Squeeze-Bottle Olive Oil, and the Vintage Shop New Yorkers Need

Given the opportunity (and my landlord’s permission), I’d happily wallpaper every single surface in my apartment. And after falling in love with Supply Showroom’s first in-house line of wall coverings, that desire has only grown. The six patterns were inspired by the Texas landscape, offering prints from bluebonnets to honeysuckles to cacti stripes. I’m envisioning Wild in a kid’s bathroom and Scallop as a surprise adorning the inside of a closet.—Kate McGregor, associate design editor

Greece Is the Word: Ancient Greek Sandals Introduces Homewares

Wavy Candles to Help Ukraine, Squeeze-Bottle Olive Oil, and the Vintage Shop New Yorkers Need

As I am of Greek descent, I’ll find any excuse to take a mental vacation to my favorite Cycladic islands. And this week’s fantasy is brought to you by the artisans at Ancient Greek Sandals. These skilled craftsmen have worked the signature Vachetta leather into the brand’s first collection of Hellenic-influenced homewares. Inspired by Aegean days and Athenian nights, the 11 pieces include wine bottle holders, ouzo carafes, bread baskets, and more—just in time for an elevated spring picnic. Don’t mind me, I’ll be over here daydreaming of Santorini, karafaki in hand, EVOO-drizzled pita within reach. —Raven McMillan, assistant editor

A Light in Darkness: Lex Pott for Ukraine

Wavy Candles to Help Ukraine, Squeeze-Bottle Olive Oil, and the Vintage Shop New Yorkers Need

You can find Lex Pott’s Twist candle on practically every cool design shop’s shelves, but 54 Celsius is giving the Insta-friendly wax a new, er, twist. In this special-edition run, $25 of every yellow and blue candle will be donated to Sunflower of Peace, a Boston-based nonprofit that is aiding victims of the war in Ukraine. —Julie Vadnal, deputy editor

Curtain Call: Jouffre’s New York Outpost

Wavy Candles to Help Ukraine, Squeeze-Bottle Olive Oil, and the Vintage Shop New Yorkers Need

The French get a lot of things right—upholstery included. Exhibit A: Romain Jouffre’s newly opened showroom-slash-studio in Queens, New York. Designed with Garcé & Dimofski, the biggest challenge the team faced was achieving elegant curves in the industrial space (something anyone who has ever lived in a loft or boxy apartment can relate to). The solution? They created scenographic niches with some paint and cleverly draped curtains. Who said window treatments had to hide a window? —Lydia Geisel, home editor


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