Published on October 6, 2019

It wasn’t too long ago that a book on 3-D-printed decor would have been located in the science fiction section of the library. Even now, after the practice has become fairly common, it still feels noteworthy—you picture the creator of that digitally made vase wearing a lab coat and sporting a hairdo akin to Doc’s in Back to the Future. This futuristic production method isn’t quite ubiquitous (yet), but it’s definitely becoming more and more popular. And with this newfound recognition comes some of the most innovative pieces on the market, none of which remotely resemble a science experiment. 

There’s a hidden bonus to this decor: Its makers frequently use recycled and renewable resources to craft their products, like corn LPA or compostable thermoplastic. You end up with objects that feel especially wonderful given the ongoing conversation surrounding sustainability. All this to say—it’s an exciting new field of design, and we can’t wait to see what comes next. For now, here’s how we’re bringing this high-tech style home: 

The Modular Candlestick 

Polish studio UAU Shop is one of our favorites in the game, known for its brightly colored concoctions that run the gamut from Memphis-inspired candleholders to ribbed vases. You may recognize the brand’s products as mainstays in trendy European concept shops like Folks and Cool Machine. Given the fact that everything is made from 100 percent biodegradable materials and looks like something your most stylish friend would own, we get the hype. 

The Perforated Pendant 

Equal parts delicate and industrial-looking, this lighting fixture deserves a spot above your dining room table. Made by Plumen in collaboration with an Italian 3-D printing studio, it also comes kitted out with an LED bulb, so you can spruce up a dim corner and save money on your energy bills while you do it. 

The Abstract Sculpture 

Given that it’s crafted from a combination of 3-D printing and hand-finishing, it’s no wonder this plaster piece by New York artist Karin Haas takes three to four weeks to make. It definitely gets the spot of honor in the middle of your mantel or coffee table—other accoutrements need not apply. 

The Shell Box

By now, you’ve seen some iteration of Spanish brand Los Objectos Decorativos’s Instagram-famous seashell ceramics, but did you know that each one is hand-shaped based on a 3-D prototype? These little vessels are especially perfect for storing tiny earrings and other dainty jewelry, but if you want to keep the tech theme going, you could also house your AirPods in one. To each his own. 

The Gold Hangers

Add some style to a cramped closet and get it organized in one fell swoop. OAO Works’s brass clothes hangers use 3-D scanning technology, so while you may not be able to acquire Cher Horowitz’s digitally savvy closet just yet, this purchase puts you one step in the right direction. 

The Architectural Vase

Illustrator Charlotte Taylor branched out from sketching to make this series of plaster pieces, and we’re so glad she did. Not only are they 3-D printed, but the multilevel-step design itself is literally three-dimensional, the perfect contrast to all the basic rectangular books on your shelves.

The Table Lamp 

Designed by Gonzalo Baxter, this sleek light rotates on its base to accommodate whatever task you’re working on. Made from naturally derived corn-based materials (yes, really) instead of plastic, it’s also eco-friendly, so you can feel at little less guilty about burning the midnight oil.

The Origami Vessel 

If you’re an avid dried flower collector, this piece will complement your blooms nicely—it’s 30 percent recycled wood and 70 percent bioplastic made from corn. Despite its futuristic design, it looks handmade. 

See more innovative designs we’re excited about:
The Coolest New Sheets Are Made With Ultrasonic Tech and Natural Dyes
Our Editor in Chief Shares Her 6 London Design Week Highlights
3 Smart Home Products We Hope to See at IKEA Soon

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