Published on April 4, 2019

When it comes to paint color advice, sometimes it’s best to just turn to the pros. British paint and wallpaper company Farrow & Ball recently released an exciting new book called Recipes for Decorating, and it’s chock-full of innovative color pairings, paint tips, and general design advice that you’ll eat up—even if you’re not planning a renovation. Released on April 2, the hardcover is available to order online today.

Written by Farrow & Ball color curator, Joa Studholme, the book is centered around 13 case studies. Each one presents a different room with useful color advice to take away. For example, a manor home in the English countryside is resplendent in richly saturated hues, and a technicolor house in Copenhagen features vibrant artwork that’s just as cool as the homeowner herself. At the end of every mini home tour, Studholme highlights a paint palette, as well as “recipe tips” that offer her recommendations for how to incorporate those hues. A mix of inspiration and service, the book is a must for any design aficionados.

Small-space dwellers, in particular, are sure to love this book. Why? It proves that bold color and fun wallpaper moments can coexist with limited square footage. Ahead are some of Studholme’s best tips for using paint to make your tiny home even chicer.

Think monochromatically

“It’s difficult to read the confines of a room when everything is one color, which makes it seem bigger,” writes Studholme. Use the same color on your walls and your woodwork to heighten the space while making the room feel tranquil and elegant.

Make use of the windows

In her own home, Studholme extends the paint color of doors and windows onto the walls and ceiling around their frames. This makes them look larger, which, in turn, opens up even the smallest of rooms. Want to take it a step further? “Extra decoration can be added in the form of a thin, colored line,” recommends the paint expert.

Go bold in your hallway

While many people might be hesitant to use dark colors in what is typically the smallest part of any house, Studholme is all for it, especially if the hall is deprived of natural light. She advises fully leaning into the cave-like look, arguing that since you’re not going to win the battle with nature for a light and airy space, you might as well use what you have to your advantage. “Don’t be frightened of using a stronger color in your hall,” writes Studholme. “A strong color in a hallway has the instant effect of making rooms leading off it appear bigger and brighter. A dark hall will create a distinct viewpoint, drawing your eye to a natural focal point such as a light-filled kitchen.”

See more paint tips:
How to Use One of the Trickiest Paint Colors in Your Home
16 Ways Painted Trim Transforms a Room
5 Ways to Get More Creative with Paint

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