By Marissa Hermanson

Published on August 6, 2017

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Photography by DROP COFFEE

These days our on-the-go lifestyle leave our coffee rituals to grab-and-go lattes and the instant gratification of K-cups. If you are looking to be more intentional with your cup of joe, consider Fika. Pronounced “fee-ka,” the Swedish ritual of taking a coffee break is a way to slow down and savor the moment of sipping coffee and enjoying a delicious pastry.

To embrace the tradition, surround yourself with these wares that are designed in Scandinavia. Both beautiful and functional, these home goods from Sweden and its Nordic neighbors will help you experience a true fika.

Drop Coffee, from 120 kr

For your authentic fika, don’t forget the main ingredient: coffee. Stockholm’s hip Drop Coffee bar roasts beans from Bolivia, Colombia, El Salvador, Ethiopia, and Kenya. The roastery supplies coffee shops with beans worldwide, and has coffee subscriptions and bags of beans for sale via their web shop, so you can enjoy a Drop Coffee brew from the comfort of your own home.

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Photography by MUUTO

Push Mugs, Muuto, $49

Designed by Danish designer Mette Duedahl for the Scandinavian company Muuto, these minimalist-inspired stoneware mugs are the perfect size for cradling a cozy cup of joe in your hands on any day of the year. The petit cup echoes the brand’s M.O. of combining beautiful design with function. After all, muutos is Finnish for “new perspectives.” 

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Photography by MUUTO

Push Coffee Maker, Muuto, $139

Pair your Push mugs with Muuto’s matching stoneware French press coffee maker, which doubles as a tea brewer or beverage pitcher. If you are enjoying fika with a friend, this is the perfect vessel for sharing.

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Photography by EVA SOLO

To Go Cup, Eva Solo, $250 kr

If you fancy an outdoor picnic-style fika, transport your coffee in Eva Solo’s sporty stainless steel thermos, which comes in an array of lovely hues.

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Photography by NORMANN COPENHAGEN

Geo Sugar Bowl, Normann Copenhagen, $18

Available in an array of pastels along with classic black, this plastic lidded jar provides a pretty place to store your sugar for sweetening tea and coffee. Designed by Nicholai Wiig Hansen for the Danish design company Normann Copenhagen, the sugar jar evokes a simplistic yet edgy look with its angular lines—and will surely steal the spotlight during a contemporary coffee hour.

 
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Photography by NORMANN COPENHAGEN

MorMor Blue Milk Jug, Normann Copenhagen, $26

Translated from Swedish, “mormor” means grandma, and Normann Copenhagen’s “MorMor” milk jug is granny chic. As a nod to the country kitchen, designer Gry Fager created the small porcelain pitcher with a traditional blue-and-white textile design, which conjures images of a cozy farmhouse nestled in Sweden’s lush, rolling countryside.

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Photography by HAY

Field Bread Board, Hay, $49

If you are going to embrace the true Swedish fika, then you need to accompany your brew with a tasty baked good. American designer Shane Schneck’s beech bread board for Danish design company Hay provides a sturdy surface to slice a loaf of bread. The designer also kept cleanup in mind, engineering the bread board so crumbs conveniently will collect in its grooved surface.

 
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Photography by HAPPYsthlm

Rose Hip tea towel, HAPPYsthlm, $24 eur

Made in Sweden, HAPPYsthlm’s linen tea towel gives a nod to traditional Swedish folk art with its blue and red floral motif. Located in Stockholm’s Gamla Stan (old town), this boutique is noteworthy for its nature-inspired contemporary housewares.

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Photography by Iris Hantverk

Saras Roof Tray by Iris Hantverk, $225 kr

Arrange your fika spread on a beautifully crafted laminate birch wood tray by the Swedish company Iris Hantverk. Located in Stockholm’s historic Gamla Stan, the boutique sells an array of housewares, along with handcrafted brushes made by visually impaired craftsmen.

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Photography by JOSEF FRANK

Josef Frank Color Coasters, $200 kr

Austrian architect and designer Josef Frank is one of Sweden’s more notable designers as he worked with the Stockholm design company Svenskt Tenn. He created the nature-inspired pattern “bows” in 1930, and his designs are now available in coaster form to gussy up your coffee table. 

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Photography by MENU

Norm Thermo Cup, Menu, $32

If you live an on-the-go lifestyle and stopping to take a fika isn’t in the cards right now, sip your coffee out of this minimalist porcelain thermos by Menu, which will keep your brew warm and spill-free.