Photography by CODY GUILFOYLE

Let’s just cut to the chase: We can’t resist a good ombre. Whether it’s a platter of tomatoes or a bedroom wall, there’s something seriously irresistible about a perfect gradient. But, hands down, our favorite way to rock the ombre is with flowers.

And no one outfits a better floral ombre than Domino Style Director Kate Berry. “Ombre arrangements are so great because you don’t need a lot, and you can use inexpensive flowers,” says Berry. She recently spent a morning rifling through the displays of her go-to vendor in New York’s flower market, Dutch Flower Line, to put together three knock-out designs that are super easy to recreate at home.

Look 1: Dreamy and dramatic blues

“Hydrangea are a big bang for your buck,” says Berry. Here, she paired them with lisianthus, alium, and clematis for a larger display with tall flowers that would be perfect in an entryway or as a centerpiece. During the summer, when hydrangeas come in dozens of shades, Berry suggests doing an arrangement just with them.

Photography by CODY GUILFOYLE

Look 2: Fiery oranges and yellows.

“All of these flowers come in all of the colors used here,” says Berry, which makes it super easy to have a variety of textures, sizes, shapes, and scales. Here, she used dahlias, marigolds, roses, zinnias, protea, and gomphrena.

Kate Berry’s top tips for the perfect floral ombre:

  1. Start with the colors you want at the opposite ends of the spectrum, and then find flowers in a range of hues to fill in the middle.
  2. Make a more interesting display by using flowers with different shapes and scales, as well as larger and smaller blooms to add texture.
  3. You don’t need a lot for any ombre—five bunches will do—but if you pick a few blooms at a lower price point, you can really amp up the volume without running up your bill. An ombre will easily make more pedestrian flowers look luxe. 
Photography by CODY GUILFOYLE

Look 3: Pretty in pink

Here, Berry used carnations, roses, dahlias, coxcomb, garden roses, and astilbe to create an on-trend arrangement that mixes high (roses) and low (carnations and coxcomb).