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While department stores may be a dying breed, Jeremiah Brent recognizes the beauty of walking into one place and finding almost anything and everything you need. His first-ever brick-and-mortar store in Los Angeles’s Culver City neighborhood, Atrio, is the 2.0 version for your home: You can leave with a jar of peach preserves, a linen sheet set, or a vintage iron coffee table. “There’s even a floral shop for last-minute flowers you may need for a dinner party,” says the interior designer. And in the very near future, there will be a sister restaurant next door called Juliet. 

But unlike Macy’s or Nordstrom, Brent’s shop doesn’t blind you with fluorescent lighting and glossy tile floors. Instead, sculptural table lamps, some out of Barcelona by Marta Bonilla (just one of his exclusive collaborators), and back-lit walls lend a warm glow, and dark wood herringbone floors act as natural arrows pointing you to the next display space. Everything is intended to engage the five senses, from the sound of water to the curated playlists to the smell of custom-scented candles. “I want people to leave the store and think to themselves, Wow, I could live there,” shares Brent. 

In addition to Bonilla’s pieces, the designer secured special collections of stone objects with Toronto’s Montana LaBelle; ceramics by Laird Gough; bedding with Sydney-based Cultiver; and art with Tappan Collective, Ethan Caflisch, and Zane Taylor. Customers who like the thrill of the hunt can also score one-of-a-kind vintage furniture, like a set of four ticking striped dining chairs with iron frames and pyramid-shaped backs. Brent’s suggestion? Put the gothic-looking seats around a handsome marble table. “You would have never thought that they could go together, but they really do, beautifully,” he says.  


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Fear not non-Californians, all of Atrio’s curated goods are shoppable online. And while there’s nothing like the feeling of perusing in person, hitting the “add to cart” button feels pretty good, too.