Published on April 21, 2019

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photo courtesy of leibal

Let’s make one thing crystal clear: Transparency isn’t our strong suit. Sure, we’re open books when it comes to personal matters of the heart, but as far as the home goes, we like to leave a little to the imagination. Tinted glass has proved to be a fitting outlet for our opaque desires.

Our infatuation with cool variations on glass has been a gradual one. What started as a mere curiosity for fluted kitchen cabinets eventually developed into a full-on obsession with the rainbow-infused works of Swiss designer Julie Richoz and Nouvel Studio. Despite the colors blossoming around us in the name of spring, a new wave of tinged glass has convinced us to go in a darker direction: Smoked glass is turning up the temperature on contemporary design.

Naturally tinted by being held to the flame, these fragile sheets of glass get their smoldering look from coats of smoke residue. The foggy treatment has changed the way we think about traditionally translucent objects—from shower walls to wine decanters to coffee tables. After all, who doesn’t love a little mystery? Here are five inspiring ways to bring the smoking-hot look home.

The Mirror

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Photo BY NICOLE FRANZEN

We’ve been doing a lot of reflecting over Susan and Ben Work’s artful powder room lately and we have a lot of thoughts on that tinted corner shelf… or is it a mirror? Every angle offers a new and hazy perspective of the bathroom, as well as ever-evolving storage opportunities. In a space with wallpaper as quirky and eye-catching as this, it’s crucial to get the angles just right.

Get the look: Copper, smoke, and pink-tinged panels take this ordinary mirror to a new level.

The Bathroom

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Photo BY NICOLE FRANZEN

Black and white bathrooms are enjoying a high-contrast moment that goes beyond the bounds of standard subway tile and see-through partitions. In the case of the Work’s dreamy master shower, a shady black panel with a hint of translucence promises privacy without squandering natural light.

Get the look: For an elevated upgrade that doesn’t include a head-to-toe remodel, this $20 storage solution is the next best fix. These streamlined jars will keep your teeniest belongings (think Q-tips and hair ties) in order.

The Statement Light

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PHOTO BY MAGGIE KLOSS

When Shannon Eddings was tasked with reviving this 19th-century mansion in Galveston, Texas, the designer decided to strike the perfect balance of old and new with rich velvet fabrics, brass accents, and timeless light fixtures. Although a chandelier dripping in crystals would have been a fitting nod to the estate’s opulent history, these gray-blue shades pick up on the home’s storied past while lending a coastal-cool feel.

Get the look: While Eddings pick skews vintage, this singular drop pendant is equally captivating.

The Home Bar

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PHOTO BY MIA BAXTER

Consuelo Pierrepont Spitler’s Austin home is a testament to the art of mixing and matching. Ranging in size, style, and color, the designer’s eclectic grouping of glassware takes a moody turn with sultry pigments.

Get the look: Tomas Kral’s Nude series takes the transparent silhouette one step further by exaggerating the spouts.

The Vignette

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Design by Tali Roth for MyDomaine photo by Jenna Peffley

Sacha Strebe’s layered Los Angeles apartment is at once minimal and livable. In addition to genuinely comfortable seating arrangements, Strebe worked with interior designer Tali Roth to curate vignettes with texture. Since Menu’s Echasse floor vase was a must-have in her family home, the pair decided to show it the love it deserves by parking it next to an aged log and filling it with pampas grass.

Get the look: Delicate to its core, the vase’s slender legs and gradient glass silhouette evoke a sense of lightness that makes it particularly fitting for soft desert florals.

See more stories like this: 
15 Glass Pieces That Make Decorating Easy
This Inspired Line Made Me a Colored Glass Convert

How 3 Designers Are Turning an Industrial Material Into Art

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