Published on October 9, 2020

Since its Hometown Heroes collective began in 2019, Madewell (in collaboration with nonprofit organization Nest) has featured more than 50 up-and-coming designers, makers, and artists on its website, and today the brand is introducing its next class. 

The initiative is simple: Four times a year, Madewell selects a number of U.S.-based artisans to sell their goods on the company’s site, introducing them to a large network of shoppers (Lolly Lolly ceramist Lalese Stamps’s mugs have already sold out). The makers receive perks, too. In addition to increased exposure and new professional connections, photography is provided for all of their products, as well as development grants so they can continue creating future collections. 

With a focus on diversity in all forms, Madewell’s new group spans a variety of geographic regions, artistic mediums, and styles. This time around the brand is introducing us to Elias and Valencia Morr of Peacesake Candles & Co., a husband-and-wife duo crafting sustainable soy candles and room sprays; Diarra Bousso of Diarrablu, a California native bringing her love of bold patterns and colors to ready-to-frame art prints; and Sarah Miller (aka Awkward Auntie), whose hand-dyed cement goodies are destined for your desk or coffee table, among others. Shop a few of our favorites, below.

Because all of Miller’s cement creations are handmade, no two pieces are the same. Split up this set of three between your powder room, main bath, and kitchen.

Bousso’s poppy prints put earthy hues–namely terracottas, blues, and greens—front and center. This one depicts a “spontaneous Moroccan escapade.”

Made for cozy autumn lounging, the Morrs’ hand-poured soy candle combines top notes of amber and musk with fig, cedarwood, and moss. 

Kentucky-based artist Ciara LeRoy’s motivational embroidery projects, sewn on upcycled cotton, are the perfect gift for anyone looking for a stylish confidence boost.

Our Fall Style issue has arrived! Subscribe now to get an exclusive first look at Ayesha Curry’s Bay Area home—and discover how design can shape our world.

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