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A new season is upon us and with that comes a fresh wave of design trends and ideas we’re impossibly anxious to bring home. As our favorite retailers begin to unveil their new collections, we find ourselves engulfed by an array of pieces that will undoubtedly inspire a refresh—and that’s something we can always get behind on. Ahead, we uncover the leading trends you need on your design radar and the new items that will help you usher them home.

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Illustration by Phuong Nguyen | Floral Print Silk Eiderdown, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi, $1,171 | ‘Herbarium’ Wallpaper, Gucci, $190 | Large Black and Yellow Pillow, Counterpane, $550

Grandma Chic

Who knew that grandma’s house would become a source of inspiration when it came to decorating our homes this fall? Yep, the trend is very real and it comes across in a myriad of ways. Think patchwork quilts reimagined with vibrant color blocks and geometrically-inspired motifs—Counterpane’s Black and Yellow pillow serves up more than its fair share of saturated hues, coupled with an intricate pattern-play, which most definitely challenges the ordinary.

Bedding is not one to be left out of the trend. Elevated renditions of classic patterns and palettes rule in this realm. Take a style cue from the above Floral Print Silk Eiderdown by Preen by Thornton Bregazzi, which promises to infuse your bedroom with a dramatic and style-focused element.

Wallpaper patterns that abide by a floral motif are yet another staple of this trend—a vintage-inspired finish is one that completes the look. Gucci’s ‘Herbarium’ wallpaper comes bearing a subtle contemporary quality, all the while maintaining its classic character.

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Illustration by Phuong Nguyen | Logan grey boucle sofa, CB2, $1,499 | Petrified Wood Rounded Stool, The Line, $1,945 | White Marble Tibby Bowl, Consort, $120.00

Whitewashed Minimalism, Reinvented

Much to the dismay of maximalists and color-enthusiasts alike, the whole whitewashed minimalist look isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. That said, we’re seeing a major departure from the sleek and streamlined Scandinavian interiors in favor of something that embodies a sculptural and raw aesthetic. Earthy elements are a prominent component of this look—think natural materials akin to this petrified wood rounded stool from The Line or Consort’s white marble Tibby bowl —reimagined with a futuristic twist.
Inspired by Japanese interiors, what the new whitewashed minimalism scheme lacks in color it more than makes up for in stature and effect. CB2’s Logan grey boucle sofa is an example of such. Its apparent simplicity is closely rivaled by its form, one that is grand yet elusive all the same. Neutrals take charge with this one, allowing the robust shape of the furnishings or decorative accents to take in the limelight instead.
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Illustration by Phuong Nguyen | Gracia Cane and Wood Wardrobe, CB2, $1,599 | Tulip Chair, Anthropologie, $1,398, Anthropologie | Fringe Table Lamp, Huldra of Norway, $725

That ’70s Look

The era of all that was colorful and rad has made quite the comeback and we’re so here for it. With it comes a fresh palette of saturated hues—many of which we often find ourselves hesitant to decorate with in the first place. A spectrum of yellows leads the charge here, complemented by vibrant pops of red and orange. Textures are yet another integral component of the trend, with the perennial It-material of the season (velvet) coming into play. This mustard-hued tulip chair, from Anthropologie, effortlessly combines the aforementioned details, resulting in one seriously swoon-worthy seat.
Fringe is yet another material that hit it big back in the day, and it’s no secret that it’s on the rebound as well. We’re infatuated with this statement-making fringe table lamp, from Huldra of Norway, that brings on a serious dose of style.
Rattan saw a revival in the ’70s and within the past few years, it’s only made a steady incline. We’re looking beyond the standard pendant or rattan seat in favor of a piece more grand in scale. Contemporary desks, made for the home study, are one way to go, this stunning Gracia cane and wood wardrobe, from CB2, is another. 
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Illustration by Phuong Nguyen | Ikea Rumtid | Georg Jensen Stainless Steel Matrix Bowl, MoMa, $195 | Pictograph 3-Drawer Dresser, West Elm, $599.99

Futuristic Fab

It’s time to look to the future for a little decorative direction. Space-age is the movement of the season and with that comes a slew of exaggerated materials (metallics in a shiny gold or silver finish), sleek lines, and modular moments. Ikea’s forthcoming Rumtid collection embraces a handful of said futuristic qualities with a focus on small-space living. While we’ll have to wait for 2020 for the actual line to hit the shelves, it’s never too early to start planning and getting ahead on the trend.
Looking for a more current rendition of the trend? West Elm’s Pictograph 3-drawer dresser challenges all pre-conceived notions of what the bedroom staple should look like. While its texturally faceted front is what initially draws the eye in, the storage piece’s soothing, muted gray tone and complementary Y-shaped legs are the tailored descriptors that match the trend. And keeping in line with the sleek and seamless, Georg Jensen’s stainless steel Matrix bowl is one that will become yet another staple of cutting-edge design.
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Illustration by Phuong Nguyen | Faux Amaranthus Stem, CB2, $12.95 | Monstera Leaf Faux Plant, Urban Outfitters, $6 | Metaflora Dried Brown Banksia + Grass + Wheat Bouquet, West Elm, $39 

Faux Florals

Consider it a natural progression from our obsession with greens. Those not privy to a green thumb can relish in on this emerging trend, born from the plethora of wild and non-traditional floral arrangements which have taken the design world by storm. Need proof? Look to West Elm’s collaboration with NYC-based floral styling studio Meta Flora, which resulted in an exclusive line of faux botanicals (such as this stunning dried brown banksia, grass, and wheat bouquet). Following in suit, a handful of other retailers began unveiling their renditions of faux botanicals, ready to be displayed per your discretion.
And while we personally can’t see ourselves passing up on fresh florals in favor of the faux, come winter—when the former proves to be difficult to source—we won’t be opposed settling on these picks instead.