Published on May 21, 2021

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Our days are punctuated by scouting new talent, attending market appointments, and scrolling Instagram in an effort to unearth the products, people, and news you actually need to know. Here’s what we Slacked one another about this week.

Food for Thought

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Photography by Teddy Wolff

I’m always on the hunt for interesting blue and white tabletop pieces, and these two new modern platters feel special and collectible. They were created by design consultancy powerhouse Polonsky & Friends in collaboration with my new favorite British tableware brand, The Sette. Each of the two platters feature either quotes from the poet Sara Teasdale or illustrations by Marie Clerté and are produced artisanally by the royal manufacturer Halcyon Days in London. Even better, 100 percent of the profits will go to World Central Kitchen, a nonprofit dedicated to helping feed hungry people and healing struggling communities across the globe through food. Having just debuted on May 15 with limited quantities, I would recommend acting fast to support this important cause. —Benjamin Reynaert, style director 

Sitting Pretty

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Photography by Erik Lefvander

While I love a crackly-crusted almond croissant or a craggy blueberry muffin, nothing beats a doughnut on a Saturday morning. Which essentially makes Dutch designer Sabine Marcelis and me soul sisters, because according to furniture brand Hem, which she recently teamed up with, Marcelis has a “perennial fascination with the round doughnut shape.” The duo’s first collaboration, the Boa pouf, is an ode to the puffy form. Two years in the making, the seat’s wood frame is enveloped in foam and glazed—er, covered—in a vibrant mélange of wool using a technique that employs every last bit of fabric. Magically, the Boa’s curves look and feel like they’re inflated with air—just like the best of its edible cousins. —Lindsey Mather, editorial director, home

Push and Pull

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Image Courtesy of Pretty Pegs

One of the easiest upgrades you can ever make to IKEA storage units is to change up the hardware. Matte black and brass are safe options, but I’m loving Helen Levi’s new ceramic collection for Prettypegs. The handmade tinted clay and ribbed shapes lend so much texture, even if your cupboard is IKEA’s classic unpainted pinewood. While I’ve got my eye on these for the Besta in my living room, remember that you can think way beyond consoles and hack your whole kitchen with them. Don’t be afraid to mix sage green knobs on the cabinet fronts with dove blue bars on the drawers. —Lydia Geisel, associate home editor 

Ice, Ice, Baby

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Photography by Daniella Morrison

What could be better than your friends starting an ice cream company? The foodiest couple I know (they’ve worked in buzzy New York City kitchens, from Cervos to Contra) launched Bad Habit in March and just released their latest flavor: Chocolate Fernet. Using Fernet from Faccia Brutto—you’ve probably seen its chic bottles around town—the collaboration is a Brooklyn match made in heaven. The result? A deep Valrhona chocolate ice cream that hints at the mint and anise notes in the liquor. Talk about a freezer flex. —Julia Stevens, associate style editor

 

Last Call

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Photography by Richard Schmidt © David Hockney, Gregory, Los Angeles, March 31st, 1982, 1982, Composite Polaroid Collection of the artist; Photography by Richard Schmidt © David Hockney, Self Portrait With Red Braces, 2003, watercolor on paper, Collection of Gregory Evans.

Nothing says “summer” quite like the transition to vibrant colors, and David Hockney’s latest exhibition at the Morgan Library and Museum in Manhattan is an ode to his bold, bright portraits on paper and decades-long art practice. The intimate look at his evolving way of drawing is punctuated by the ornate ceilings and surrounds of the museum. Closing on May 30th, there’s just a few days to catch it before it’s gone. And make sure to exit through the gift shop for an array of Hockney-inspired goods. I picked up a ceramic eggcup that embodies the spirit and, um, face of the artist, which immediately brings a smile to mine.  —Megan West, head of brand and creative studio

 

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