By Julie Shaver

Published on May 28, 2015

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Photography by Elliven Studio

I absolutely love to incorporate vintage pieces into our home's decor.  Not sure how to do it?  Here are some tips!

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Photography by Elliven Studio

Always make sure you look past the current state of the piece.  It's easy to get caught up on the poor fabric or terrible paint colour, but if you're able to look past those elements and to see what can become of the piece with some key updates, then you won't miss those great finds!  New fabric or a fresh coat of paint is a great way to make the piece work with your current decor.

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Case in point: the two chairs in my office.  They used to belong to my Husband's Grandparents, some new fabric was all it took to bring out the amazing details!

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Knicks are character!  You've heard it before, I'm sure, but it's so true.  This lovely console came with chips in the paint.  The beauty of it?  The chips reveal an under-layer of gold foil!  I love it so much more because of that!  A vintage console is the perfection option for your entry or hallway.

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Plus, you just can't beat the detail!  Beautifully carved and gorgeous lines, it was love at first sight!

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Smaller items are the best for filling in voids and for vignettes.  For instance, tea cups are so beautiful and can easily act as decor.  I stacked a few saucers and topped them with two tea cups to help add some colour and personality to this corner in our kitchen.

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Vintage brass candlesticks are great accessories and work in any room! The best part, they are typically inexpensive. Be sure to check your local thrift store often for these beautiful accessories!

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Mixing old and new is a great way to add personality to your space.  These chairs came with our vintage dining room set, but I chose to put them with our kitchen table instead.  The curved lines of the chair offset the straight lines of the harvest table.