Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE
Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by Michael Wiltbank

Just nine miles from the southern coast of Spain, this cosmopolitan city boasts beautiful views, untouched beaches, and friendly people. Check out why we love its warm, multicultural vibe.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

The narrow, maze-like streets of the medina were constructed to provide shade from the hot African sun.

Medina: The old walled city embodies Tangier’s vibrant spirit through the hustle and bustle of its marketplace.

American Legation As the first public property acquired abroad by the United States—and the only listing on the US National Register of Historic Places outside the country’s borders—the American Legation served as a consulate until 1956, but it’s now a free museum, cultural center, and research library concentrating on Arabic language studies. Inside its stuccoed Moorish structure, you’ll find paintings by American artist Marguerite McBey and a gallery devoted to expat writer and composer Paul Bowles. 8 rue America, +212 5 39 93 53 17; legation.org

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

A boutique filled with handwoven fabrics and local artwork in the city’s medina.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Hand-loomed and embroidered textiles made by local artisans in the villages and the Rif mountains surrounding Tangier.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Bleu de Fes

Its selection of high-quality Moroccan specialties (rugs, pottery, and textiles) at reasonable prices makes this one of our favorite shops in the city. Owners Abdul and Atil are ready to bargain and aim to please. 65 rue les Almohades, +212 5 39 33 60 67

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photo by Half Baked Harvest

Michelle modeling the local fashions.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photo Courtesy of Athena Calderone

Shopping the medina

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by Michael Wiltbank

A hand-woven silk throw

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Details from a hand-hooked Beni Ourain rug.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photo by Sunday Suppers

Paintings at Galerie Conil

Galerie Conil For up-and-coming artists, the Galerie Conil is the city’s taste-making showcase, serving as a venue for top international talent (whose work is often available at a fraction of Paris exhibition prices). In addition to admiring the art, visitors will also be grateful for its relaxing atmosphere, a welcome break from the commotion of the medina. 7 rue du Palmier, +212 6 55 64 10 14; conilgalerie.com

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

A vivid mosaic of geometric tiles.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

The keyhole arch is a traditional element of Islamic architecture.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photo by Oh Sweet Basil

Casbah

Ancient architecture, old-world charm, and undeniable mystique make it the most beautiful part of Tangier.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Tree trunks—painted white to protect them from the city’s pollution—are transformed into unexpected works of art.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

The rooftop lounge at Nord-Pinus

Grand Hotel Nord-Pinus 

 

A stylish alternative to the casbah’s other boutique options, this intimate retreat was once a pasha’s palace. Designed with a French twist by hotelier Anne Igou, the accommodations feature luxurious four-post beds, bathrooms with wild geometric tiles, and a shaded courtyard. An added bonus: the building sits at the highest point of the rue Riad Sultan, with views of the Spanish coast from its rooftop terrace. 811 rue Riad Sultan, +212 6 61 22 81 40; nord-pinus-tanger.com

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by Michael Wiltbank
Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE
back to basics
photographs by Brittany Ambridge produced by Michelle Adams
so right now!
This season, design returns to the simplicity of raw,
honest materials and patterns, such as unfinished
woods, rough-woven textiles, and ticking.
Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Image by Belle Morizio

Alfresco dining at Le Salon Bleu

Le Salon Bleu For a tea break from a day spent sightseeing or a leisurely late-afternoon lunch, this picturesque café’s view, decor, and service will make it a go-to favorite. Try the chicken tagine and the chocolate torte—to die for! 71 rue Amrah, +212 6 62 11 27 24

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Laure Welfling’s popular boutique in the casbah offers everything from handmade ceramics to custom fashions and jewelry.

 

Laure Welfling A much-frequented stop among the cognoscenti while abroad, this chic shop isn’t to be missed. Owned by Laure Welfling, a Parisian ex-pat, and her artist husband, Guidi de Richemont Salvy (who designs many of the store’s wares), the boutique trades in everything from caftans to original watercolors. (We stocked up on ceramic plates and artwork!) Afterward, stop in for a mint tea next door at the couple’s Cercle de Musique Arabo-Andalouse, where you’ll be serenaded by traditional Moroccan lute players. 3 place de la Kasbah, +212 5 39 94 97 89

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by Michael Wiltbank

Shell bust from Laure Welfling’s popular boutique

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by Michael Wiltbank

Ceramic plate from Laure Welfling’s popular boutique

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photo by Michael Wiltbank

Camel treks through the Erg Chebbi Merzouga offer exotic views of the Northern Moroccan desert.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE
Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photo by Jessi’s Kitchen

Mohand mini-suite at the Dar Nour

 

Dar Nour This romantic hotel is known for its cozy guest rooms and spacious terraces with glimpses of Tangier’s maze-like medina. The classic Moroccan interiors feature patterned textiles, plush loomed wool rugs, and colorful hanging lanterns. 20 rue Gourna, +212 6 62 11 27 24; darnour.com

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by Skye Parrot

The Charf room at the Dar Sultan boasts vibrant blue walls, a collection of pottery from Fez, and panoramic views of the Strait of Gibraltar.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by Michael Wiltbank

Heiress Barbara Hutton reigned over casbah society.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Villa Joséphine

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

The palm-shaded pool of the Villa Joséphine overlooks the sprawling Rif mountainside.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photo by Molly Winters

Aroundtown

From posh resorts to a demigod’s grotto, Tangier teems with historic sites and picturesque pleasures.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

The crystal-blue waters of the North African coast.

L’Océan Located on the Sidi Kacem beach, this lunch spot and beach club is a favorite of locals and tourists alike. In addition to feasting on terrific seafood, guests may (weather permitting) enjoy sand yachting, surfing, or merely soaking up the spectacular scenery. A 20-minute drive from the city, it’s the closest thing to the South of France you’ll find in Tangier. Plage Sidi Kacem, +212 5 39 33 81 37; oceanplagetanger.com

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photo by Kristen Strecker for Food & Wine

Beachside relaxation

 

Sidi Mghait: The Muslim holy man after whom this beach is named may well be spinning in his grave over the easygoing lifestyle of this untouched playground. A few kilometers south of Tangier, this local treasure is a peaceful gem. 

 

Le Mirage: With 45 deluxe bungalow suites and wide picture windows overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, Le Mirage boasts the best view outside the medina. Its posh amenities and direct access to the beach make it a perfect spot for celebrities traveling incognito, as well as vacationing families. Just eight kilometers (five miles) from the Royal golf club and 15 kilometers (about nine miles) from the Spanish coast, its location is pretty sweet, too. Les Grottes d’Hercule, BP 2198, +212 5 39 33 33 32; www.lemirage.com

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photo by Cody Guilfoyle

Caves of Hercules: Looking out over the Strait of Gibraltar, this sublime grotto is one of the city’s most popular tourist attractions. According to legend, the demigod spent the night here before performing his 11th labor (retrieving apples from the Garden of the Hesperides). Located just 14 kilometers (about nine miles) from the city, it’s an easy, inspired afternoon jaunt. Cap Spartel

 

The sea window in the Cave of Hercules

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Librairie des Colonnes

For more than 60 years, the Librairie de Colonnes has been the city’s hip hub for urbane bookworms. Frequented by a long list of famous literary travelers, and now owned by Pierre Bergé—the longtime romantic partner of the late Yves Saint Laurent—the shop hosts author signings, has an active literary review, and keeps Arabic, French, and English texts in stock. 54 boulevard Pasteur, +212 5 39 93 69 55; librairie-des-colonnes.com

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by Michael Wiltbank

Our favorite book about Tangier!

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Imagery byMadeline Montoya

Painters Eugène Delacroix and Henri Matisse and writer Tennessee Williams once called the historic Grand Hôtel Villa de France home.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

A breakfast repast

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by Michael Wiltbank

Matisse’s 1912 masterpiece, Paysage vu d’une fenetre, was inspired by the view from his window at the Grand Hôtel Villa de France.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Handmade rugs

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Bazar Atlas: at the east end of rue Tijara, it’s an insider spot for scoring well-priced ceramics and rugs (the domino staff bought seven!). 25-90050 rue Tijara, +212 5 39 41 78 64

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by Michael Wiltbank

Green pottery from the village of Tamegroute

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by Studio Onik 

Details from a hand-hooked Beni Ourain rug.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Chairs with table inbetween.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE Photography by SKYE PARROT

High ceilinged room with long table with flower vase on it.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Table with flower vases.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE

Bedroom with nightstand and no door.

Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE
Photography by BRITTANY AMBRIDGE