Published on August 13, 2021

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Miles Aldridge - Virgin Mary. Supermarkets. Popcorn. Photographs 1999 to 2020. Courtesy of Fotografiska New York

Our days are punctuated by scouting new talent, attending market appointments, and scrolling Instagram in an effort to unearth the products, people, and news you actually need to know. Here’s what we Slacked one another about this week.

Cool Collab: Stüssy x Tekla 

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The hypebeasts are surely giddy: Last Friday iconic streetwear brand Stüssy and Copenhagen textile studio Tekla launched a line of California-meets-Copenhagen towels, bedding, and loungewear. But there’s a lot for the rest of us to love, too. Tekla’s signature hand-drawn stripes have been rendered in soothing, low-key cream and black on a 100 percent organic cotton duvet, while Stüssy’s classic swirls got the terry towel (and robe) treatment, bringing to mind ocean waves. If you can’t make it to the beach, this collaboration is the next best thing. Lindsey Mather, editorial director, home

Art Buff: Fotografiska

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When my family visits from California, things are busy, to say the least. Our routine often involves something along the lines of restaurant-shop-museum-repeat. While the Metropolitan and Via Carota are always hits, being able to discover something new together makes me feel like we’re tourists in my own city. For us this past weekend, that was Fotografiska. I had been hearing about the experiential photography museum since its opening in 2019, originally for its chic restaurant designed by Roman and Williams (currently temporarily closed). The journey begins on the top floor—to which you arrive in a trippy wallpapered elevator—and you work your way down, each level offering a show better than the last. The curated music synced to each exhibit was my favorite part, creating a true escape from reality. Julia Stevens, associate style editor

Brand-New Bag: State Bags x Target

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When I was a child, I loved going back-to-school shopping (in actual stores!) and getting new gear. So if you’re a parent like me whose kid’s school is finally opening up for full-time, in-person learning after a year and a half of being remote, you might also be the happiest person in the world with this news: State Bags and Target have teamed up on a collection of vibrantly patterned backpacks and lunch boxes. The checkered style is perfect for my daughter, Quinn, who has been into “edgier” looks lately versus the pink and glitter of two years ago. And we can actually go see it at the Target down the street! But the real plus is that with every backpack purchased, State and Target will support American children and families in need through initiatives like donating fully stocked backpacks at their bag-drop rallies. That really makes me happy. Kate Berry, chief content officer 

Pet Pillow: Minna Dog Beds

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Beyond the fact that these mixed-pattern, Sol LeWitt–inspired dog beds are aesthetically supercool, they’re also handwoven by a group of artisans in Comalapa, Guatemala; made from 100 percent cotton (i.e., machine washer/dryer friendly); and designed by Minna, a queer-led brand that’s dedicated to creating ethically made goods. I mean, the company even pulled together a tutorial for DIYing a dog bed insert to coincide with the launch of this collection—because making your own from out-of-play soft goods (old tees, towels, bedding) that you have around the house is a great sustainable addition. Cat Dash, contributing editor

Get Scrappy: Offcut

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I’ve always had a thing for one-of-a-kind furnishings; the idea that nobody else in the world owns the exact same object fills me with joy. So when I heard about Offcut, a new branch of Chicago-based Jason Lewis Furniture, I was intrigued. The line of furniture and accessories is made from the woodworking studio’s leftover materials, from live-edge American elm to stained honey locust, and Offcut releases new designs on its site and Instagram weekly. Truth be told, I don’t really need new stools for my tiny New York apartment, but handmade pieces that don’t break the bank are hard to come by. Edith Rousselot, editorial intern

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