Published on September 2, 2019

Flame stitch is probably not a word you’ve uttered recently (or ever), but you know what it is. That colorful, zigzag pattern Missoni made popular in the ’50s? Yep, flame stitch. We like to think of it as a relative of chevron. In many ways, the two designs are quite similar—they’ve both got the inverted V going for them—but where the chevron is made up of hard angles, the flame stitch is made up of trippy squiggles. But since its heyday, the motif has been overlooked. According to online vintage retailer Chairish, flame stitch is poised for a comeback.

“We’re loving this pattern in rich, earthy tones like dark greens, blues, cinnamon, oxblood, and clay,” says Chairish cofounder Anna Brockway. In those deep shades, the funky print feels just right for autumn, which is probably how it landed on the company’s fall trends forecast in the first place. Where would you rather be on a chilly October day than in a room swathed in brightly colored knit textiles? Our inner Margherita Missonis are relishing the very thought of it. Get in on this throwback trend before it spreads like wildfire with our favorite picks below.  

The coral hue of these 1970s stools really bring out the blaze-like shapes in the upholstery. You don’t even need to find matching chairs to park them in front of. Instead, use them at the foot of the bed or to add symmetry to a living room layout.

Inspired by mosaic vases from Naples (think of the vessels that are sitting in the Met’s Ancient Roman wing) and woven on machines from the 1940s, this braided cable urn is both a spot to store farmers market flowers and a history lesson. 

Archive’s throw pillow is dizzying in all the right ways. The circular cushion is covered with a traditional textile from Almolonga, Guatemala, that’s made using a back-strap loom. 

That armchair isn’t going to reupholster itself. Put an end to the wishful thinking and give this peacock green fabric a whirl. 

If there were ever a case for splurging on an $11,000 sofa, this curved Missoni design is definitely it. 

This hand-knotted rug, a collaboration between Wolfum and Burritt Brothers, is what it would look like if you took a magnifying glass to flame stitching.

See more stories like this: 
Piping Is for More Than Just Cakes
Is It Just Us or Does This Decor Look Like Soft-Serve Ice Cream?
Our 4 Favorite Under-the-Radar Trends in Chairish’s Fall Report

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