In the pantheon of status hand soaps, I thought I’d seen it all. In West Hollywood homes, I’ve spotted Compagnie de Provence Savon de Marseille in rose. At some hip Brooklyn restaurants, $25-a-pop Le Labo is the liquid of choice. My yoga studio pumps out Malin + Goetz. Even on a vacation in Marfa, a one-stoplight town in the middle of West Texas, I spotted a bottle of Aesop in the bathroom of an art museum. 

But after shelling out for expensive refills, most of which come in plastic bottles that are wasteful and annoying to pour, I was on the hunt for something less disposable but just as luxe. Enter Eddi, my new handwashing hero. 

Courtesy of Eddi

My Eddi starter kit came with a clean-lined, seamless-looking stainless steel dispenser (I went with the cornflower shade) and three aluminum cans of soap refills. (No. Plastic.) Eager to set it up, I tossed the directions in the trash, pulled apart the dispenser, and started pouring the soap from the aluminum can into the lower half. It felt wrong in the moment, but also, that’s how I’ve filled every soap dispenser ever, so how off could I be?

Turns out, extremely off. Sure, it still pumped out soap, but had I read the directions—please read the directions!—I’d have realized that refilling the dispenser should be a complete mess-free affair. The aluminum cans of soap fit directly inside the body of the canister (face to palm), the pump goes into the can, and the cap tucks neatly underneath the bottom of the dispenser. No more pouring, no more mess. (Peep the brand’s handy demonstration here.)

And it’s not just a cool dispenser. Each of the liquid soaps smells much more expensive than it is (a four-pack of the 9.5-ounce cans is $44) and is nondrying, even on my sanitizer-ravaged hands. Happy Hour, for instance, has a mix of amber and myrrh that rivals the luxe soaps I’d been using until now.