Published on July 2, 2020

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Photography by Magdalena Wosinska; Styling by Monica Rose

Introducing Domino’s new podcast, Design Time, where we explore spaces with meaning. Each week, join editor-in-chief Jessica Romm Perez along with talented creatives and designers from our community to explore how to create a home that tells your story. Listen now and subscribe for new episodes every Thursday.

While you might know Kelly Wearstler for her trademarks—peacock green, painterly geometrics, expertly curated vintage seating—her vision is constantly evolving. On the first installment of Domino’s new podcast, Design Time, the interior design icon and star of our Summer issue joins editor-in-chief Jessica Romm Perez to talk about the curiosity that informs her craft and what’s on her radar right now. 

During the episode (out today on Spotify and Apple Podcast), Wearstler shares advice on everything from how to make terracotta feel fresh to ways you can nail the focal point of a room. The industry veteran also dishes on the new recipes she’s been testing out at home during quarantine. (Hint: a copious amount of pasta is involved.) Of course, we couldn’t say goodbye without asking Wearstler about her 10 favorite things, including the design book she keeps returning to and her go-to kitchen tool. Here’s a sneak peek at some of the items and moments that make her happy.

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Photography by Aaron Bengochea

My Vintage Source 

1stdibs has been around for a long time and it has so much reach globally. We use it in our studio all the time. I think [it’s] doing it right. There are emerging artists [and] contemporary artisans from all over the world.”

 

My Print

“My Graffito pattern—soon to be available as a digital wallcovering—is an ever-evolving classic and feels fresh with each new colorway and iteration.”

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Courtesy of Kelly Wearstler

 

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Photography courtesy of Kelly Wearstler

My Wind Down Ritual

“To unwind is coming home and seeing my two boys and my husband, and decompressing with a glass of wine.” 

My Favorite Blooms 

“Wisteria is like the unicorn of the plant world because it only comes out for two weeks a year. I love the color, the shape, the form, everything.”

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Photography by Julian Elliott/Getty Images
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Copyrighted by Paramount Pictures Corporation; Incorporated Artwork by Saul Bass

My Design Icons  

“There are so many [people who inspire me], and they come from all different genres of design and in the creative world. But I would say artist Helen Frankenthaler, Josef Hoffmann, and graphic designer Saul Bass.”

 

My Color Pairing 

“Something I’m feeling right now: saffron and oxblood.”

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Photography courtesy of Kelly Wearstler

 

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Photography courtesy of Kelly Wearstler

My Texture of the Moment

“This is a really challenging one. I would probably say stone and patinated metals.” 

 

My Favorite Hotel

“[My hotel] is always changing, but one of my favorites is Hotel Saint Cecilia in Austin, Texas. I love the city so much, and it’s a great, charming, small hotel that feels residential.” 

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Courtesy of Hotel Saint Cecilia

 

My Morning Essential 

“My new La Marzocco Linea Mini espresso maker.”

 

My Movie on Repeat

The Last Dance, which is about the story of Michael Jordan. I live for sports. I love going to games with my family and the competitive nature of sports. I love seeing what’s in these athletes’ minds and how they got to where they are, their mentality.”

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Photography by Alexander Hassenstein/Bongarts/Getty Images

 

My Must-Read

The Elements of Style by Stephen Calloway—it’s a book I reference all the time. It really captures all the periods of design in every detail. It truly is a gem. There are new editions, but I have one that I think was printed in 1991 or ’92. It really is just anything that was designed, whether it’s a pattern of a floor or window details, stairwells, patterns—anything in that period is in this book.”