Published on March 17, 2017

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Photography by MICHAEL WILTBANK

Sheepskins are one of those versatile pieces no space should be without. They’re perfect when draped over a modern sofa or over the back of a dining chair, layered atop a solid rug, casually laid at the foot of the bed – the possibilities are endless. So, while we’ve got our standard set of black, white, or gray sheepskins, a playfully colorful twist couldn’t hurt. Surprisingly enough, dyeing a sheepskin was much easier than we could’ve ever imagined. See for yourself!

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Photography by MICHAEL WILTBANK

What You’ll Need

  • A large basin
  • Water
  • One sheepskin (we used this faux version)
  • Paint stir stick
  • Fabric dye
  • 1 teaspoon salt
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Photography by MICHAEL WILTBANK

Fill the basin with enough lukewarm water to cover the sheepskin. Soak the sheepskin in the basin for at least one hour. If you’re using a real sheepskin, allow for a few additional hours of soaking time. Remove the sheepskin from the water and lightly wring it out to get rid of excess water.

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Photography by MICHAEL WILTBANK

Refill the basin with water and add the dye. Add in two to five capfuls of dye, depending on the how saturated you’d prefer the end result to be. We opted for two capfuls of red dye for a light pink finish. Stir until the dye has completely dissolved within the water. Add in the salt and stir. This will help the fabric dye stick to the sheepskin.

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Photography by MICHAEL WILTBANK

Soak the sheepskin in the dye for at least two hours and up to eight hours if using a real sheepskin. 

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Photography by MICHAEL WILTBANK

Flip the sheepskin over a few times while soaking to ensure that the dye is applied evenly.

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Photography by MICHAEL WILTBANK

Remove the sheepskin and rinse under lukewarm water to get rid of excess dye. Hang to dry, preferably by sunlight. Once it has dried, lightly brush out any knots using a comb or soft-bristled brush.