By Elly Leavitt

Published on July 16, 2017

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Photography by GLOBOTREKS

While we’re always fans of minimalist decor, sometimes brighter is better, and nowhere is this more true than with travel. Here are 12 of the world’s most colorful streets, featuring rows of vividly-colored homes and storefronts, to add to your travel bucket list ASAP.

 
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Photography by ANNA KOCHARIAN

Copenhagen, Denmark

Once a busy commercial port for ships (the oldest building there dates back to 1681), Copenhagen’s Nyhavn area has been fully reinvented into a bustling commercial neighborhood. Now, it’s the ideal spot to grab an early dinner and listen to music, all while watching the sun set on the canal.

 
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Photography by CLAIRE USCHERSOHN

London, England

London isn’t exactly a tropical paradise, but what it lacks in climatic vibrancy it more than makes up for in architecture. Between Notting Hill, Chalcott Square, and Neal’s Yard (to name a few), you won’t be hard-pressed to find color-filled neighborhoods.

 
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Photography by ANNA KOCHARIAN

Stockholm, Sweden

Stockholm’s old town, Gamla Stan, is home to a number of historical buildings. Head to Stortorget, the scenic main square, which is well-known for both its iconic colorful buildings and its annual Christmas market.
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Photography by STACY BAUER

Capetown, South Africa

For some of the brightest homes you will ever see, go to Bo-Kaap in Capetown. The pastel-hued houses coupled with the historic Bo-Kaap Museum that dates back to the 1760s make this area one of Capetown’s biggest attractions.

Image courtesy of Stacy Bauer via mckennableu.com.

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Photography by THEPHILLYPHOTOBLOG.COM

Venice, Italy

The Venetian island of Burano is renowned for its vibrant streets, but don’t miss out on picking up some handmade lace goods while you’re there. It’s the island’s main export.

Image courtesy of thephillyphotoblog.com.

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Photography by ANNA KOCHARIAN

Bergen, Norway

The harbor-facing houses in Bergen’s Bryggen Hanseatic Wharf are made of painted wood and are now home to many of the town’s bistros, galleries, and craft stores. The historic area has been so well preserved that Bryggen has even been made into a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 
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Photography by HISTORYINHIGHHEELS.COM

Charleston, South Carolina

A series of 13 colorful houses, Rainbow Row is a must-see for any Charleston visitors. Located on E Bay Street, this tourist hot spot represents the longest cluster of Georgian row houses in the United States.

Image courtesy of historyinhighheels.blogspot.com

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Photography by TOEUROPEANDBEYOND.COM

Paris, France

It’s definitely hard to pick just one photogenic spot in Paris, but the colorful Rue Crémieux makes a good case for itself. The brightly-hued cobblestone street is lined with plants, making it possibly the most picturesque little street the French capital has to offer (just be sure to go early if you’re planning on shooting, as it fills up quickly with like-minded tourists!).

 

Image courtesy of toeuropeandbeyond.com

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Photography by GOBIERNO DE LA CIUDAD DE BUENOS AIRES

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Located in the La Boca neighborhood of Buenos Aires, Caminito is essentially a street museum. Known for its street art, it’s full of performers, artists, and open-air cafés from which to take in the stunning view.

Image courtesy of Gobierno de la Cuidad de Buenos Aires via us.hola.com

 

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Photography by PANORAMIO

Salvador, Brazil

Pelourinho is the historic center of Salvador, dating back to colonial times. Spend a morning walking around the cobblestone area, which is chock full of colorful houses, churches, and lively restaurants and bars.

Image courtesy of Panoramio

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Photography by GLOBOTREKS

Chefchaouen, Morocco

Calling all monochrome lovers: The Medina in Chefchaouen is a must-see. The entire city was painted in various shades of blue by Jewish refugees from Europe in the 1930s.

Image courtesy of globotreks.com

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Photography by @UGRTANDOGAN VIA INSTAGRAM

Istanbul, Turkey

Balat, the traditional Jewish quarter of Istanbul, still has the historic charm of an old town in the form of antique shops and traditional bakeries selling local delicacies. It’s a welcome respite from the busier streets of central Istanbul.

Image courtesy of @ugrtandogan via Instagram.